TOLSTOY FARM, DAMAGED BY FLOODS, IS REACHING OUT FOR HELP

Diane (Tolstoy Farmer and long-time manager of the Spokane Farmers' Market) stands in the deep gully that used to be the main driveway to the community

Diane (Tolstoy Farmer and long-time manager of the Spokane Farmers’ Market) stands in the deep gully that used to be the main driveway to the community

Tolstoy Farm, founded in 1963, is an intentional community situated in a scenic canyon near Davenport, WA. It’s the oldest, still extant, non-religious intentional community in the U.S. About 30 folks reside on the communally-owned land. It is also home to a 5-acre organic market farm known to some as Eden Gardens and to others as Tolstoy Farms. The farm, which has existed for most of the community’s 50-year history, is a collectively-managed organic produce farm growing a vast diversity of crops. It is the anchor organic produce vendor at the thriving Spokane Farmers’ Market (a market that farmers from Tolstoy were instrumental in establishing in 1998). Tolstoy Farms operates a coveted CSA program for about 60 customers (and still have shares available for 2014). CSA customers and farmers’ market regulars know how dedicated the Tolstoy farmers are to organic ethics and methods. They know they will always get the finest quality produce and knowledgeable, friendly service from the Tolstoy farmers.

This year, however, is going to be one of the most difficult in the history of Tolstoy Farm. Earlier this year, on Feb. 12th and February 26th, both the community of residents and the farm at Tolstoy suffered severe damage from two back-to-back major floods. Caused by a “perfect storm” combination of hard, frozen ground (not allowing run-off to soak in), warm temperatures with rapid snow melt and a record 24 hour rain event, creeks overflowed, houses were flooded, water lines washed away and four community bridges were destroyed. On top of that, the main driveway to the community was gouged out by flood waters to a depth of four feet in places making it impassable. Most devastating of all, one of the creeks that used to supply water to several houses and irrigation to the farm was rerouted by the flood. It now disappears into the ground leaving those houses without their water supply and causing the farm to purchase and install 800 additional feet of expensive, four-inch aluminum irrigation pipe in order to access the above-ground portion of the creek so that farming can commence.

I live and farm at Tolstoy, but my homestead is half-way up the canyon side so I was spared damage from the floods. I’m reaching out on behalf of my fellow communitarians who could really use some support.

Tolstoy Farm has touched the lives of thousands of people over the years whether they were visitors to the community who came away with a fresh perspective of how society could be organized in more egalitarian manner or if they were customers at the farmers’ market stand in Spokane.

Now, Tolstoy Farm needs some help from the greater community to bounce back from the hit they took earlier this year with the floods. Please visit their web page and find out how you can contribute, either by joining a work party or contributing financially. This is a time to join together to support a community in need. Please visit the Tolstoy Farm Flood Recovery Fund page at:

http://www.tolstoyfarms.org/flood-recovery

There is a PayPal button on this page to make donating fast and easy.